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split out notes chapter; tidy a few infelicities

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Brennen Bearnes 7 years ago
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./general_purpose/index.md
./diff/index.md
./further_reading/index.md
./notes/index.md
./links.md

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@ -7,7 +7,7 @@ do textual comparison. When pen, paper, and typesetting were what scholars
had to work with, they did some amazingly sophisticated things in order to
expose the relationships between multiple pieces of text.
{slide: some textual criticism tools}
{photo: some textual criticism tools}
Here's a book I got in college. _Gospel Parallels: A Comparison of the
Synoptic Gospels_, by Burton H. Throckmorton, Jr. It breaks up three books
@ -34,4 +34,8 @@ now there are a lot of ways to say "here's how this file is different from this
file", or "here's how this file is different from itself a year ago". It turns
out that these work just about as well for English text as they do for code.
{demo various diff tools, source control}
{discussion of various diff tools, source control - discussion of diff between
scripts written earlier for poem tagging. discussion of diff / wdiff between,
maybe, various translations of poems or Bible translations or what have you.
diff between two snapshots of a web page that's obviously undergone editing.
who knows man, I'm just riffin' here.}

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further reading
===============
_The Unix Programming Environment_ - Brian W. Kernighan, Rob Pike
bits that might become end notes later
--------------------------------------
I just ran `dict model`. It's a word with many fascinating definitions, but my
favorite of the bunch is probably this bit of ridiculous, eye-glazing
prolixity:
9. An abstract and often simplified conceptual representation
of the workings of a system of objects in the real world,
which often includes mathematical or logical objects and
relations representing the objects and relations in the
real-world system, and constructed for the purpose of
explaining the workings of the system or predicting its
behavior under hypothetical conditions; as, the
administration's model of the United States economy
predicts budget surpluses for the next fifteen years;
different models of the universe assume different values
for the cosmological constant; models of proton structure
have grown progressively more complex in the past century.
[PJC]
This one is also pretty good:
From The Free On-line Dictionary of Computing (26 July 2010) [foldoc]:
1. <simulation> A description of observed or predicted
behaviour of some system, simplified by ignoring certain
details. Models allow complex {systems}, both existent and
merely specified, to be understood and their behaviour
predicted. A model may give incorrect descriptions and
predictions for situations outside the realm of its intended
use. A model may be used as the basis for {simulation}.
7. further reading
==================
- _The Unix Programming Environment_ - Brian W. Kernighan, Rob Pike

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index.md

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@ -28,7 +28,17 @@ obscure, and generally uninviting. I intend to gloss over many complexities in
favor of demonstrating a rough-and-ready toolset that&rsquo;s helped me immeasurably
in my own work.</p>
<p>&ndash; bpb</p>
<p>This is very much a work in progress, and some sections may be absent or
riddled with error.</p>
<p>&ndash; bpb / <a href="//p1k3.com">p1k3</a> / <a href="https://twitter.com/brennen">@brennen</a></p>
<h2><a name=copying href=#copying>#</a> copying</h2>
<p>I may eventually just dedicate this thing to the public domain, but for the
time being please feel free to use it under the terms of Creative Commons BY-SA
(Attribution / Share-Alike), whatever the latest version is. I promise I will
not license it under more restrictive terms than that.</p>
<h2><a name=contents href=#contents>#</a> contents</h2>
@ -36,8 +46,8 @@ in my own work.</p>
<li><a href="#a-book-about-the-command-line-for-humans">a book about the command line for humans</a>
<ul>
<li><a href="#copying">copying</a></li>
<li><a href="#contents">contents</a></li>
<li><a href="#license">license</a></li>
</ul>
</li>
<li><a href="#the-command-line-as-a-literary-environment">1. the command line as a literary environment</a>
@ -69,23 +79,12 @@ in my own work.</p>
</li>
<li><a href="#general-purpose-programmering">5. general purpose programmering</a></li>
<li><a href="#diff-wdiff-git">6. diff, wdiff, git</a></li>
<li><a href="#further-reading">further reading</a>
<ul>
<li><a href="#bits-that-might-become-end-notes-later">bits that might become end notes later</a></li>
</ul>
</li>
<li><a href="#further-reading">7. further reading</a></li>
<li><a href="#notes">notes</a></li>
</ul>
</p>
<h2><a name=license href=#license>#</a> license</h2>
<p>I may eventually just dedicate this thing to the public domain, but for the
time being please feel free to use it under the terms of Creative Commons BY-SA
(Attribution / Share-Alike), whatever the latest version is. I promise I will
not license it under more restrictive terms than that.</p>
<hr />
<h1><a name=the-command-line-as-a-literary-environment href=#the-command-line-as-a-literary-environment>#</a> 1. the command line as a literary environment</h1>
@ -1684,11 +1683,13 @@ and mark the interesting ones.</p>
<em>write</em> them. I write little tiny ones all the time, and the ability to read
other people&rsquo;s scripts comes in handy. Oftentimes, the best, most tasteful way
to automate something is to build a script out of the commonly available
commands. They&rsquo;re already there on millions of machines. Many of them have
been pretty well understood for a generation, and most of them will probably be
around for a generation or three to come. They do neat stuff. Scripts let you
build on the things you&rsquo;ve already figured out on the command line, and give
repeatable operations a memorable, user-friendly name.</p>
commands. The standard tools are already there on millions of machines. Many
of them have been pretty well understood for a generation, and most of them
will probably be around for a generation or three to come. They do neat stuff.
Scripts let you build on things you&rsquo;ve already figured out, and give repeatable
operations a memorable, user-friendly name. They encourage reuse of existing
programs, and help express your ideas in a repeatable fashion to people who&rsquo;ll
come after you.</p>
<p>One of the reliable markers of powerful software is that it can be scripted: It
extends to its users some of the same power that its authors used in creating
@ -1751,11 +1752,21 @@ out that these work just about as well for English text as they do for code.</p>
<hr />
<h1><a name=further-reading href=#further-reading>#</a> further reading</h1>
<h1><a name=further-reading href=#further-reading>#</a> 7. further reading</h1>
<ul>
<li><em>The Unix Programming Environment</em> - Brian W. Kernighan, Rob Pike</li>
</ul>
<hr />
<h1><a name=notes href=#notes>#</a> notes</h1>
<p><em>The Unix Programming Environment</em> - Brian W. Kernighan, Rob Pike</p>
<p>For now, this section is a catch-all for things that don&rsquo;t quite fit anywhere
else, but might become end-notes, sidebars, or some other kind of marginalia.</p>
<h2><a name=bits-that-might-become-end-notes-later href=#bits-that-might-become-end-notes-later>#</a> bits that might become end notes later</h2>
<p style="text-align:center;"> *</p>
<p>I just ran <code>dict model</code>. It&rsquo;s a word with many fascinating definitions, but my
favorite of the bunch is probably this bit of ridiculous, eye-glazing


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@ -18,17 +18,20 @@ obscure, and generally uninviting. I intend to gloss over many complexities in
favor of demonstrating a rough-and-ready toolset that's helped me immeasurably
in my own work.
-- bpb
This is very much a work in progress, and some sections may be absent or
riddled with error.
contents
--------
-- bpb / [p1k3](//p1k3.com) / [@brennen](https://twitter.com/brennen)
{{contents}}
license
copying
-------
I may eventually just dedicate this thing to the public domain, but for the
time being please feel free to use it under the terms of Creative Commons BY-SA
(Attribution / Share-Alike), whatever the latest version is. I promise I will
not license it under more restrictive terms than that.
contents
--------
{{contents}}

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[p1k3]: //p1k3.com/
[atbrennen]: https://twitter.com/brennen

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notes
=====
For now, this section is a catch-all for things that don't quite fit anywhere
else, but might become end-notes, sidebars, or some other kind of marginalia.
-> * <-
I just ran `dict model`. It's a word with many fascinating definitions, but my
favorite of the bunch is probably this bit of ridiculous, eye-glazing
prolixity:
9. An abstract and often simplified conceptual representation
of the workings of a system of objects in the real world,
which often includes mathematical or logical objects and
relations representing the objects and relations in the
real-world system, and constructed for the purpose of
explaining the workings of the system or predicting its
behavior under hypothetical conditions; as, the
administration's model of the United States economy
predicts budget surpluses for the next fifteen years;
different models of the universe assume different values
for the cosmological constant; models of proton structure
have grown progressively more complex in the past century.
[PJC]
This one is also pretty good:
From The Free On-line Dictionary of Computing (26 July 2010) [foldoc]:
1. <simulation> A description of observed or predicted
behaviour of some system, simplified by ignoring certain
details. Models allow complex {systems}, both existent and
merely specified, to be understood and their behaviour
predicted. A model may give incorrect descriptions and
predictions for situations outside the realm of its intended
use. A model may be used as the basis for {simulation}.

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