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split out notes chapter; tidy a few infelicities

Brennen Bearnes 5 years ago
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a6d1b6eb97
10 changed files with 95 additions and 67 deletions
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      index.html
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@@ -6,4 +6,5 @@
6 6
 ./general_purpose/index.md
7 7
 ./diff/index.md
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 ./further_reading/index.md
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+./notes/index.md
9 10
 ./links.md

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diff/index.md View File

@@ -7,7 +7,7 @@ do textual comparison.  When pen, paper, and typesetting were what scholars
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 had to work with, they did some amazingly sophisticated things in order to
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 expose the relationships between multiple pieces of text.
9 9
 
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-{slide: some textual criticism tools}
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+{photo: some textual criticism tools}
11 11
 
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 Here's a book I got in college.  _Gospel Parallels: A Comparison of the
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 Synoptic Gospels_, by Burton H. Throckmorton, Jr.  It breaks up three books
@@ -34,4 +34,8 @@ now there are a lot of ways to say "here's how this file is different from this
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 file", or "here's how this file is different from itself a year ago".  It turns
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 out that these work just about as well for English text as they do for code.
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-{demo various diff tools, source control}
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+{discussion of various diff tools, source control - discussion of diff between
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+scripts written earlier for poem tagging.  discussion of diff / wdiff between,
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+maybe, various translations of poems or Bible translations or what have you.
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+diff between two snapshots of a web page that's obviously undergone editing.
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+who knows man, I'm just riffin' here.}

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further_reading/index.md View File

@@ -1,38 +1,4 @@
1
-further reading
2
-===============
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-
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-_The Unix Programming Environment_ - Brian W. Kernighan, Rob Pike
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-
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-bits that might become end notes later
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---------------------------------------
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-
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-I just ran `dict model`.  It's a word with many fascinating definitions, but my
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-favorite of the bunch is probably this bit of ridiculous, eye-glazing
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-prolixity:
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-
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-     9. An abstract and often simplified conceptual representation
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-        of the workings of a system of objects in the real world,
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-        which often includes mathematical or logical objects and
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-        relations representing the objects and relations in the
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-        real-world system, and constructed for the purpose of
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-        explaining the workings of the system or predicting its
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-        behavior under hypothetical conditions; as, the
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-        administration's model of the United States economy
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-        predicts budget surpluses for the next fifteen years;
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-        different models of the universe assume different values
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-        for the cosmological constant; models of proton structure
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-        have grown progressively more complex in the past century.
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-        [PJC]
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-
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-This one is also pretty good:
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-
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-    From The Free On-line Dictionary of Computing (26 July 2010) [foldoc]:
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-
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-     1. <simulation> A description of observed or predicted
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-     behaviour of some system, simplified by ignoring certain
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-     details.  Models allow complex {systems}, both existent and
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-     merely specified, to be understood and their behaviour
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-     predicted.  A model may give incorrect descriptions and
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-     predictions for situations outside the realm of its intended
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-     use.  A model may be used as the basis for {simulation}.
1
+7. further reading
2
+==================
38 3
 
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+- _The Unix Programming Environment_ - Brian W. Kernighan, Rob Pike

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@@ -0,0 +1 @@
1
+index.md

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index.html View File

@@ -28,7 +28,17 @@ obscure, and generally uninviting.  I intend to gloss over many complexities in
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 favor of demonstrating a rough-and-ready toolset that&rsquo;s helped me immeasurably
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 in my own work.</p>
30 30
 
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-<p>&ndash; bpb</p>
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+<p>This is very much a work in progress, and some sections may be absent or
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+riddled with error.</p>
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+
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+<p>&ndash; bpb / <a href="//p1k3.com">p1k3</a> / <a href="https://twitter.com/brennen">@brennen</a></p>
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+
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+<h2><a name=copying href=#copying>#</a> copying</h2>
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+
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+<p>I may eventually just dedicate this thing to the public domain, but for the
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+time being please feel free to use it under the terms of Creative Commons BY-SA
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+(Attribution / Share-Alike), whatever the latest version is.  I promise I will
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+not license it under more restrictive terms than that.</p>
32 42
 
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 <h2><a name=contents href=#contents>#</a> contents</h2>
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@@ -36,8 +46,8 @@ in my own work.</p>
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 <li><a href="#a-book-about-the-command-line-for-humans">a book about the command line for humans</a>
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 <ul>
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+<li><a href="#copying">copying</a></li>
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 <li><a href="#contents">contents</a></li>
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-<li><a href="#license">license</a></li>
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 </ul>
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 </li>
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 <li><a href="#the-command-line-as-a-literary-environment">1. the command line as a literary environment</a>
@@ -69,23 +79,12 @@ in my own work.</p>
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 </li>
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 <li><a href="#general-purpose-programmering">5. general purpose programmering</a></li>
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 <li><a href="#diff-wdiff-git">6. diff, wdiff, git</a></li>
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-<li><a href="#further-reading">further reading</a>
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-
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-<ul>
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-<li><a href="#bits-that-might-become-end-notes-later">bits that might become end notes later</a></li>
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-</ul>
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-</li>
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+<li><a href="#further-reading">7. further reading</a></li>
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+<li><a href="#notes">notes</a></li>
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 </ul>
79 85
 
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 </p>
81 87
 
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-<h2><a name=license href=#license>#</a> license</h2>
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-
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-<p>I may eventually just dedicate this thing to the public domain, but for the
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-time being please feel free to use it under the terms of Creative Commons BY-SA
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-(Attribution / Share-Alike), whatever the latest version is.  I promise I will
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-not license it under more restrictive terms than that.</p>
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-
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 <hr />
90 89
 
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 <h1><a name=the-command-line-as-a-literary-environment href=#the-command-line-as-a-literary-environment>#</a> 1. the command line as a literary environment</h1>
@@ -1684,11 +1683,13 @@ and mark the interesting ones.</p>
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 <em>write</em> them.  I write little tiny ones all the time, and the ability to read
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 other people&rsquo;s scripts comes in handy.  Oftentimes, the best, most tasteful way
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 to automate something is to build a script out of the commonly available
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-commands.  They&rsquo;re already there on millions of machines.  Many of them have
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-been pretty well understood for a generation, and most of them will probably be
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-around for a generation or three to come.  They do neat stuff.  Scripts let you
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-build on the things you&rsquo;ve already figured out on the command line, and give
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-repeatable operations a memorable, user-friendly name.</p>
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+commands.  The standard tools are already there on millions of machines.  Many
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+of them have been pretty well understood for a generation, and most of them
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+will probably be around for a generation or three to come.  They do neat stuff.
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+Scripts let you build on things you&rsquo;ve already figured out, and give repeatable
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+operations a memorable, user-friendly name.  They encourage reuse of existing
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+programs, and help express your ideas in a repeatable fashion to people who&rsquo;ll
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+come after you.</p>
1692 1693
 
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 <p>One of the reliable markers of powerful software is that it can be scripted: It
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 extends to its users some of the same power that its authors used in creating
@@ -1751,11 +1752,21 @@ out that these work just about as well for English text as they do for code.</p>
1751 1752
 
1752 1753
 <hr />
1753 1754
 
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-<h1><a name=further-reading href=#further-reading>#</a> further reading</h1>
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+<h1><a name=further-reading href=#further-reading>#</a> 7. further reading</h1>
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+
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+<ul>
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+<li><em>The Unix Programming Environment</em> - Brian W. Kernighan, Rob Pike</li>
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+</ul>
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+
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+
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+<hr />
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+
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+<h1><a name=notes href=#notes>#</a> notes</h1>
1755 1765
 
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-<p><em>The Unix Programming Environment</em> - Brian W. Kernighan, Rob Pike</p>
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+<p>For now, this section is a catch-all for things that don&rsquo;t quite fit anywhere
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+else, but might become end-notes, sidebars, or some other kind of marginalia.</p>
1757 1768
 
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-<h2><a name=bits-that-might-become-end-notes-later href=#bits-that-might-become-end-notes-later>#</a> bits that might become end notes later</h2>
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+<p style="text-align:center;"> *</p>
1759 1770
 
1760 1771
 <p>I just ran <code>dict model</code>.  It&rsquo;s a word with many fascinating definitions, but my
1761 1772
 favorite of the bunch is probably this bit of ridiculous, eye-glazing

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index.md View File

@@ -18,17 +18,20 @@ obscure, and generally uninviting.  I intend to gloss over many complexities in
18 18
 favor of demonstrating a rough-and-ready toolset that's helped me immeasurably
19 19
 in my own work.
20 20
 
21
+This is very much a work in progress, and some sections may be absent or
22
+riddled with error.
21 23
 
22
-contents
23
---------
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+-- bpb / [p1k3](//p1k3.com) / [@brennen](https://twitter.com/brennen)
24 25
 
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-{{contents}}
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-
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-license
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+copying
28 27
 -------
29 28
 
30 29
 I may eventually just dedicate this thing to the public domain, but for the
31 30
 time being please feel free to use it under the terms of Creative Commons BY-SA
32 31
 (Attribution / Share-Alike), whatever the latest version is.  I promise I will
33 32
 not license it under more restrictive terms than that.
33
+
34
+contents
35
+--------
36
+
37
+{{contents}}

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@@ -1 +1,2 @@
1 1
 [p1k3]: //p1k3.com/
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+[atbrennen]: https://twitter.com/brennen

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@@ -0,0 +1 @@
1
+index.md

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@@ -0,0 +1,38 @@
1
+notes
2
+=====
3
+
4
+For now, this section is a catch-all for things that don't quite fit anywhere
5
+else, but might become end-notes, sidebars, or some other kind of marginalia.
6
+
7
+-> * <-
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+
9
+I just ran `dict model`.  It's a word with many fascinating definitions, but my
10
+favorite of the bunch is probably this bit of ridiculous, eye-glazing
11
+prolixity:
12
+
13
+     9. An abstract and often simplified conceptual representation
14
+        of the workings of a system of objects in the real world,
15
+        which often includes mathematical or logical objects and
16
+        relations representing the objects and relations in the
17
+        real-world system, and constructed for the purpose of
18
+        explaining the workings of the system or predicting its
19
+        behavior under hypothetical conditions; as, the
20
+        administration's model of the United States economy
21
+        predicts budget surpluses for the next fifteen years;
22
+        different models of the universe assume different values
23
+        for the cosmological constant; models of proton structure
24
+        have grown progressively more complex in the past century.
25
+        [PJC]
26
+
27
+This one is also pretty good:
28
+
29
+    From The Free On-line Dictionary of Computing (26 July 2010) [foldoc]:
30
+
31
+     1. <simulation> A description of observed or predicted
32
+     behaviour of some system, simplified by ignoring certain
33
+     details.  Models allow complex {systems}, both existent and
34
+     merely specified, to be understood and their behaviour
35
+     predicted.  A model may give incorrect descriptions and
36
+     predictions for situations outside the realm of its intended
37
+     use.  A model may be used as the basis for {simulation}.
38
+

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script/README.md View File

@@ -0,0 +1 @@
1
+index.md

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