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fiddling with typography & web/ text

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Brennen Bearnes 6 years ago
parent
commit
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5 changed files with 141 additions and 99 deletions
  1. +7
    -7
      general_purpose/index.md
  2. +81
    -56
      index.html
  3. +3
    -3
      literary_environment/index.md
  4. +2
    -2
      programmerthink/index.md
  5. +48
    -31
      web/index.md

+ 7
- 7
general_purpose/index.md View File

@ -10,15 +10,15 @@ enough be skipped. It's more in the way of philosophical rambling than
concrete instruction, and will be of most use to those with an existing
background in writing code.
-> * <-
-> <-
If you've used computers for more than a few years, you're probably viscerally
aware that most software is fragile and most systems decay. In the time since
I took my first tentative steps into the little world of a computer (a friend's
dad's unidentifiable gaming machine, my own father's blue monochrome Zenith
laptop, the Apple II) the churn has been overwhelming. By now I've learned my
way around vastly more software -- operating systems, programming languages and
development environments, games, editors, chat clients, mail systems -- than I
way around vastly more software --- operating systems, programming languages and
development environments, games, editors, chat clients, mail systems --- than I
presently could use if I wanted to. Most of it has gone the way of some
ancient civilization, surviving (if at all) only in faint, half-understood
cultural echoes and occasional museum-piece displays. Every user of technology
@ -34,7 +34,7 @@ technological dominance ca. 2014 of companies like Apple, Google, and Facebook.
Why is this, exactly?
-> * <-
-> <-
As I've said (and hopefully shown), the commands you write in your shell
are essentially little programs. Like other programs, they can be stored
@ -71,7 +71,7 @@ about, in fact, is putting a file (or three) in a particular place. And this
is in keeping with a basic insight of Unix: Pieces of software that do one
very simple thing generalize well. Good command line tools are like a hex
wrench, a hammer, a utility knife: They embody knowledge of turning, of
striking, of cutting -- and with this kind of knowledge at hand, the user can
striking, of cutting --- and with this kind of knowledge at hand, the user can
change the world even though no individual tool is made with complete knowledge
of the world as a whole. There's a lot of power in the accumulation of small
competencies.
@ -86,7 +86,7 @@ you think about most of these things, they have some very rough edges, but they
give otherwise simple tools ways to communicate without becoming
super-complicated along the way.
-> * <-
-> <-
What is the command line?
@ -94,7 +94,7 @@ The command line is an environment of tool use.
So are kitchens, workshops, libraries, and programming languages.
-> * <-
-> <-
Here's a confession: I don't like writing shell scripts very much, and I
can't blame anyone else for feeling the same way.

+ 81
- 56
index.html View File

@ -101,11 +101,12 @@ mirror, and welcome feedback there.

<li><a href="#wdiff">wdiff</a></li>
</ul>
</li>
<li><a href="#the-internet-for-humans-and-how-the-command-line-can-help">7. the internet for humans, and how the command line can help</a>
<li><a href="#the-command-line-and-the-web">7. the command line and the web</a>
<ul>
<li><a href="#reading-the-web">reading the web</a></li>
<li><a href="#writing-the-web">writing the web</a></li>
<li><a href="#writing-the-web-easier">writing the web, easier</a></li>
</ul>
</li>
<li><a href="#further-reading">8. further reading</a></li>
@ -449,7 +450,7 @@ Jo Walton
<!-- end -->
<p>But there&rsquo;s another approach to this &ndash; <code>sort</code> is good at only displaying a line
<p>But there&rsquo;s another approach to this &mdash; <code>sort</code> is good at only displaying a line
once, but suppose we wanted to see a count of how many different lists an
author shows up on? <code>sort</code> doesn&rsquo;t do that, but a command called <code>uniq</code> does,
if you give it the option <code>-c</code> for <strong>c</strong>ount.</p>
@ -535,7 +536,7 @@ Vanessa Veselka
<p>I like to think of the <code>&gt;</code> as looking like a little funnel. It can be
dangerous &ndash; you should always make sure that you&rsquo;re not going to clobber
dangerous &mdash; you should always make sure that you&rsquo;re not going to clobber
an existing file you actually want to keep.</p>
<p>If you want to tack more stuff on to the end of an existing file, you can use
@ -674,7 +675,10 @@ bunzip2 (1) - a block-sorting file compressor, v1.0.6
bzip2 (1) - a block-sorting file compressor, v1.0.6
comm (1) - compare two sorted files line by line
sort (1) - sort lines of text files
sq (1) - squeeze or unsqueeze a sorted word list
texindex (1) - sort Texinfo index files
tsort (1) - perform topological sort
unsq (1) - squeeze or unsqueeze a sorted word list
</code></pre>
<!-- end -->
@ -870,7 +874,7 @@ delimited by spaces? It turns out that if you don’t use -d,
to using tab characters for a delimiter.</p>
<p>Tab characters are sort of weird little animals. You can&rsquo;t usually <em>see</em> them
directly &ndash; they&rsquo;re like a space character that takes up more than one space
directly &mdash; they&rsquo;re like a space character that takes up more than one space
when displayed. By convention, one tab is usually rendered as 8 spaces, but
it&rsquo;s up to the software that&rsquo;s displaying the character what it wants to do.</p>
@ -1455,8 +1459,8 @@ the same tools for other problems and other data.

<p style="text-align:center;"></p>
<p>When I first started writing stuff on the web, I edited a page &ndash; a single HTML
file &ndash; by hand. When the entries on my nascent blog got old, I manually
<p>When I first started writing stuff on the web, I edited a page &mdash; a single HTML
file &mdash; by hand. When the entries on my nascent blog got old, I manually
cut-and-pasted them to archive files with names like <code>old_main97.html</code>, which
held all of the stuff I&rsquo;d written in 1997.</p>
@ -1563,18 +1567,18 @@ filenames, but I wind up using it quite a bit.

<pre><code>$ find ~/p1k3/archives/2012/ -type f | xargs perl -ne 'print "$1\n" if m{&lt;h2&gt;(.*?)&lt;/h2&gt;}'
pursuit
A miracle, in fact, means work
&lt;em&gt;technical notes for late october&lt;/em&gt;, or &lt;em&gt;it gets dork out earlier these days&lt;/em&gt;
more observations on gear nerdery &amp;amp; utility fetishism
timebinding animals
fragment
this poem again
i'll do better next time
timebinding animals
more observations on gear nerdery &amp;amp; utility fetishism
pursuit
thrift
A miracle, in fact, means work
&lt;em&gt;technical notes for late october&lt;/em&gt;, or &lt;em&gt;it gets dork out earlier these days&lt;/em&gt;
radio
i'll do better next time
light enough to travel
12:06am
radio
"figures like Heinlein and Gingrich"
</code></pre>
@ -1845,7 +1849,7 @@ important:

<pre><code>$ ls -l okpoems
-rwxrwxr-x 1 brennen brennen 163 Apr 19 00:08 okpoems
-rwxr-xr-x 1 brennen brennen 163 Apr 17 15:16 okpoems
</code></pre>
<!-- end -->
@ -1865,9 +1869,8 @@ accomplish this by saying something like:

<pre><code>$ ./okpoems
/home/brennen/p1k3/archives/2013/2/9
/home/brennen/p1k3/archives/2012/3/17
/home/brennen/p1k3/archives/2012/3/26
/home/brennen/p1k3/archives/2012/2/9
</code></pre>
<!-- end -->
@ -2068,15 +2071,15 @@ enough be skipped. It’s more in the way of philosophical rambling than
concrete instruction, and will be of most use to those with an existing
background in writing code.</p>
<p style="text-align:center;"> *</p>
<p style="text-align:center;"> </p>
<p>If you&rsquo;ve used computers for more than a few years, you&rsquo;re probably viscerally
aware that most software is fragile and most systems decay. In the time since
I took my first tentative steps into the little world of a computer (a friend&rsquo;s
dad&rsquo;s unidentifiable gaming machine, my own father&rsquo;s blue monochrome Zenith
laptop, the Apple II) the churn has been overwhelming. By now I&rsquo;ve learned my
way around vastly more software &ndash; operating systems, programming languages and
development environments, games, editors, chat clients, mail systems &ndash; than I
way around vastly more software &mdash; operating systems, programming languages and
development environments, games, editors, chat clients, mail systems &mdash; than I
presently could use if I wanted to. Most of it has gone the way of some
ancient civilization, surviving (if at all) only in faint, half-understood
cultural echoes and occasional museum-piece displays. Every user of technology
@ -2092,7 +2095,7 @@ technological dominance ca. 2014 of companies like Apple, Google, and Facebook.<
<p>Why is this, exactly?</p>
<p style="text-align:center;"> *</p>
<p style="text-align:center;"> </p>
<p>As I&rsquo;ve said (and hopefully shown), the commands you write in your shell
are essentially little programs. Like other programs, they can be stored
@ -2132,7 +2135,7 @@ about, in fact, is putting a file (or three) in a particular place. And this
is in keeping with a basic insight of Unix: Pieces of software that do one
very simple thing generalize well. Good command line tools are like a hex
wrench, a hammer, a utility knife: They embody knowledge of turning, of
striking, of cutting &ndash; and with this kind of knowledge at hand, the user can
striking, of cutting &mdash; and with this kind of knowledge at hand, the user can
change the world even though no individual tool is made with complete knowledge
of the world as a whole. There&rsquo;s a lot of power in the accumulation of small
competencies.</p>
@ -2147,7 +2150,7 @@ you think about most of these things, they have some very rough edges, but they
give otherwise simple tools ways to communicate without becoming
super-complicated along the way.</p>
<p style="text-align:center;"> *</p>
<p style="text-align:center;"> </p>
<p>What is the command line?</p>
@ -2155,7 +2158,7 @@ super-complicated along the way.

<p>So are kitchens, workshops, libraries, and programming languages.</p>
<p style="text-align:center;"> *</p>
<p style="text-align:center;"> </p>
<p>Here&rsquo;s a confession: I don&rsquo;t like writing shell scripts very much, and I
can&rsquo;t blame anyone else for feeling the same way.</p>
@ -2356,8 +2359,8 @@ one of these with diff -u:

<pre><code>$ diff -u ../script/okpoems ../script/findprop
--- ../script/okpoems 2014-04-19 00:08:03.321230818 -0600
+++ ../script/findprop 2014-04-21 21:51:29.360846449 -0600
--- ../script/okpoems 2014-04-17 15:16:59.852962836 -0600
+++ ../script/findprop 2014-05-12 15:50:27.358501804 -0600
@@ -1,7 +1,13 @@
#!/bin/bash
@ -2492,8 +2495,8 @@ called Night. And there was evening and there was morning, the first day.
<pre><code>$ diff -u genesis_nkj genesis_nrsv
--- genesis_nkj 2014-05-11 16:28:29.692508461 -0600
+++ genesis_nrsv 2014-05-11 16:28:29.744508459 -0600
--- genesis_nkj 2014-05-12 15:50:27.346501744 -0600
+++ genesis_nrsv 2014-05-12 15:50:27.346501744 -0600
@@ -1,6 +1,6 @@
-In the beginning God created the heavens and the earth. The earth was without
-form, and void; and darkness was on the face of the deep. And the Spirit of
@ -2529,8 +2532,8 @@ one-line-per-verse, and try again:

<pre><code>$ diff -u genesis_nkj_by_verse genesis_nrsv_by_verse
--- genesis_nkj_by_verse 2014-05-11 16:51:14.312457198 -0600
+++ genesis_nrsv_by_verse 2014-05-11 16:53:02.484453134 -0600
--- genesis_nkj_by_verse 2014-05-12 15:50:27.346501744 -0600
+++ genesis_nrsv_by_verse 2014-05-12 15:50:27.346501744 -0600
@@ -1,5 +1,5 @@
-In the beginning God created the heavens and the earth.
-The earth was without form, and void; and darkness was on the face of the deep. And the Spirit of God was hovering over the face of the waters.
@ -2597,13 +2600,11 @@ called Night. So the And there was evening and the
<hr />
<p>lynx: Invalid Option: -linksonly</p>
<h1><a name=the-internet-for-humans-and-how-the-command-line-can-help href=#the-internet-for-humans-and-how-the-command-line-can-help>#</a> 7. the internet for humans, and how the command line can help</h1>
<h1><a name=the-command-line-and-the-web href=#the-command-line-and-the-web>#</a> 7. the command line and the web</h1>
<p>Web browsers are really complicated these days. They&rsquo;re full of rendering
engines, audio and video players, programming languages, development tools,
databases &ndash; you name it, and there&rsquo;s a fair chance it&rsquo;s in there somewhere.
databases &mdash; you name it, and there&rsquo;s a fair chance it&rsquo;s in there somewhere.
The modern web browser is kitchen sink software, and to make matters worse, it
is <em>totally surrounded</em> by technobabble. It can take <em>years</em> to come to terms
with the ocean of words about web stuff and sort out the meaningful ones from
@ -2640,8 +2641,8 @@ your browser sends some text to the server and waits to see what it says back.
&lt;/html&gt;
</code></pre>
<p><code>curl</code> is a program with lots and lots of features &ndash; it too is a little bit of
a kitchen sink &ndash; but it has one core purpose, which is to grab things from
<p><code>curl</code> is a program with lots and lots of features &mdash; it too is a little bit of
a kitchen sink &mdash; but it has one core purpose, which is to grab things from
URLs and spit them back out. It&rsquo;s a little bit like <code>cat</code> for things on the
web. Try the above command with just about any URL you can think of, and
you&rsquo;ll probably get <em>something</em> back. Let&rsquo;s try this book:</p>
@ -2659,11 +2660,10 @@ you’ll probably get something back. Let’s try this book:
&lt;body&gt;
</code></pre>
<p><code>hello_world.html</code> and <code>p1k3.com/userland-book</code> are both <strong>H</strong>yper<strong>T</strong>ext
<strong>M</strong>arkup <strong>L</strong>anguage. HTML has been around for quite a while now, and it&rsquo;s
undergone a huge amount of politicking and overengineering, but at heart it
still looks a lot <a href="http://info.cern.ch/hypertext/WWW/TheProject.html">like it did in
1991</a>.</p>
<p><code>hello_world.html</code> and <code>userland-book</code> are both HyperText Markup Language.
HTML has been around for quite a while now, and it&rsquo;s undergone a huge amount of
politicking in the last 20 years, but at heart it still looks a lot <a href="http://info.cern.ch/hypertext/WWW/TheProject.html">like it
did in 1991</a>.</p>
<p>The basic idea is that the contents of a web page are marked up with tags.
A tag looks like this:</p>
@ -2675,15 +2675,23 @@ A tag looks like this:

`-opening tag
</code></pre>
<p>Most HTML these days is generated by software that pulls stuff out of databases
and stitches it together into something your browser will recognize, but it&rsquo;s
still entirely possible to write simple HTML documents in your text editor of
choice, and tools that work with text can operate on HTML documents.</p>
<p>Sometimes you&rsquo;ll see tags with what are known as &ldquo;attributes&rdquo;:</p>
<pre><code>&lt;a href="http://p1k3.com/userland-book"&gt;userland&lt;/a&gt;
</code></pre>
<p>This is how links are written in HTML. <code>href="..."</code> tells the browser where to
go when the user clicks on &ldquo;userland&rdquo;.</p>
<p>Tags are a way to describe not so much what something should <em>look like</em> as
what something <em>means</em>. Browsers are, in large part, big collections of
knowledge about the meanings of tags and ways to represent those meanings.</p>
<p>While the browser you use day-to-day is (probably) a graphical interface which
<p>While the browser you use day-to-day is (probably) a graphical interface and
does all sorts of things impossible to render in a terminal, some of the
earliest web browsers were entirely text-based, and options still exist. Lynx,
which originated at the University of Kansas in the early 1990s, still works:</p>
earliest web browsers were entirely text-based, and text-mode browsers still
exist. Lynx, which originated at the University of Kansas in the early 1990s,
is still actively maintained:</p>
<pre><code>$ lynx -dump 'http://p1k3.com/userland-book/' | head
userland
@ -2697,12 +2705,12 @@ which originated at the University of Kansas in the early 1990s, still works:
with an audience of mixed technical background.
</code></pre>
<p>If you invoke Lynx <em>without</em> the <code>-dump</code> option, it&rsquo;ll start up in interactive
mode, and you can navigate between links with the arrow keys. <code>-dump</code> spits a
rendered version of the page to standard output, with links annotated as
<code>[1]</code>-style footnotes and printed at the bottom of the output. Another useful
option here is <code>-listonly</code>, which will output just the list of links contained
within a page:</p>
<p>If you invoke Lynx without any options, it&rsquo;ll start up in interactive mode, and
you can navigate between links with the arrow keys. <code>-dump</code> spits a rendered
version of a page to standard output, with links annotated as <code>[1]</code>-style
footnotes and printed at the bottom of the output. Another useful option here
is <code>-listonly</code>, which will print just the list of links contained within a
page:</p>
<pre><code>$ lynx -dump -listonly 'http://p1k3.com/userland-book/' | head
@ -2717,8 +2725,8 @@ References
10. http://p1k3.com/userland-book/#copying
</code></pre>
<p>Another option is w3m, which copes a little more gracefully with some of
the complexities of modern web layout.</p>
<p>An alternative to Lynx is w3m, which copes a little more gracefully with of the
complexities of modern web layout.</p>
<pre><code>$ w3m -dump 'http://p1k3.com/userland-book/' | head
userland
@ -2733,9 +2741,26 @@ hook for talking about the tools I use every day with an audience of mixed
technical background.
</code></pre>
<p>Neither of these options are going to replace enormously capable applications
like Chrome or Firefox for most users, but they have their place in the toolbox,
and help to demonstrate how the web is built (in part) on principles we&rsquo;ve already
seen at work.</p>
<h2><a name=writing-the-web href=#writing-the-web>#</a> writing the web</h2>
<p>{to come}</p>
<p>Most of the web that you interact with is generated by software that pulls data
out of databases and stitches it together into something your browser will
recognize, but it&rsquo;s still entirely possible to write complete HTML documents in
your text editor of choice.</p>
<p>{more to come}</p>
<h2><a name=writing-the-web-easier href=#writing-the-web-easier>#</a> writing the web, easier</h2>
<p>I&rsquo;m pretty comfortable writing HTML by hand. It&rsquo;s part of my day job, and I&rsquo;ve
been doing it for quite a while now.</p>
<p>{more to come}</p>
<hr />

+ 3
- 3
literary_environment/index.md View File

@ -312,7 +312,7 @@ authors. We can make sure our list doesn't contain repeating lines by using
<!-- end -->
But there's another approach to this -- `sort` is good at only displaying a line
But there's another approach to this --- `sort` is good at only displaying a line
once, but suppose we wanted to see a count of how many different lists an
author shows up on? `sort` doesn't do that, but a command called `uniq` does,
if you give it the option `-c` for **c**ount.
@ -388,7 +388,7 @@ Check it out:
<!-- end -->
I like to think of the `>` as looking like a little funnel. It can be
dangerous -- you should always make sure that you're not going to clobber
dangerous --- you should always make sure that you're not going to clobber
an existing file you actually want to keep.
If you want to tack more stuff on to the end of an existing file, you can use
@ -678,7 +678,7 @@ delimited by spaces? It turns out that if you don't use `-d`, `cut` defaults
to using tab characters for a delimiter.
Tab characters are sort of weird little animals. You can't usually _see_ them
directly -- they're like a space character that takes up more than one space
directly --- they're like a space character that takes up more than one space
when displayed. By convention, one tab is usually rendered as 8 spaces, but
it's up to the software that's displaying the character what it wants to do.

+ 2
- 2
programmerthink/index.md View File

@ -47,8 +47,8 @@ the same tools for other problems and other data.
-> ★ <-
When I first started writing stuff on the web, I edited a page -- a single HTML
file -- by hand. When the entries on my nascent blog got old, I manually
When I first started writing stuff on the web, I edited a page --- a single HTML
file --- by hand. When the entries on my nascent blog got old, I manually
cut-and-pasted them to archive files with names like `old_main97.html`, which
held all of the stuff I'd written in 1997.

+ 48
- 31
web/index.md View File

@ -1,10 +1,9 @@
lynx: Invalid Option: -linksonly
7. the internet for humans, and how the command line can help
=============================================================
7. the command line and the web
===============================
Web browsers are really complicated these days. They're full of rendering
engines, audio and video players, programming languages, development tools,
databases -- you name it, and there's a fair chance it's in there somewhere.
databases --- you name it, and there's a fair chance it's in there somewhere.
The modern web browser is kitchen sink software, and to make matters worse, it
is _totally surrounded_ by technobabble. It can take _years_ to come to terms
with the ocean of words about web stuff and sort out the meaningful ones from
@ -41,8 +40,8 @@ Let's illustrate this. I've written a really simple web page that lives at
</body>
</html>
`curl` is a program with lots and lots of features -- it too is a little bit of
a kitchen sink -- but it has one core purpose, which is to grab things from
`curl` is a program with lots and lots of features --- it too is a little bit of
a kitchen sink --- but it has one core purpose, which is to grab things from
URLs and spit them back out. It's a little bit like `cat` for things on the
web. Try the above command with just about any URL you can think of, and
you'll probably get _something_ back. Let's try this book:
@ -59,11 +58,10 @@ you'll probably get _something_ back. Let's try this book:
<body>
`hello_world.html` and `p1k3.com/userland-book` are both **H**yper**T**ext
**M**arkup **L**anguage. HTML has been around for quite a while now, and it's
undergone a huge amount of politicking and overengineering, but at heart it
still looks a lot [like it did in
1991](http://info.cern.ch/hypertext/WWW/TheProject.html).
`hello_world.html` and `userland-book` are both HyperText Markup Language.
HTML has been around for quite a while now, and it's undergone a huge amount of
politicking in the last 20 years, but at heart it still looks a lot [like it
did in 1991](http://info.cern.ch/hypertext/WWW/TheProject.html).
The basic idea is that the contents of a web page are marked up with tags.
A tag looks like this:
@ -74,15 +72,22 @@ A tag looks like this:
| `- closing tag
`-opening tag
Most HTML these days is generated by software that pulls stuff out of databases
and stitches it together into something your browser will recognize, but it's
still entirely possible to write simple HTML documents in your text editor of
choice, and tools that work with text can operate on HTML documents.
Sometimes you'll see tags with what are known as "attributes":
While the browser you use day-to-day is (probably) a graphical interface which
<a href="http://p1k3.com/userland-book">userland</a>
This is how links are written in HTML. `href="..."` tells the browser where to
go when the user clicks on "userland".
Tags are a way to describe not so much what something should _look like_ as
what something _means_. Browsers are, in large part, big collections of
knowledge about the meanings of tags and ways to represent those meanings.
While the browser you use day-to-day is (probably) a graphical interface and
does all sorts of things impossible to render in a terminal, some of the
earliest web browsers were entirely text-based, and options still exist. Lynx,
which originated at the University of Kansas in the early 1990s, still works:
earliest web browsers were entirely text-based, and text-mode browsers still
exist. Lynx, which originated at the University of Kansas in the early 1990s,
is still actively maintained:
$ lynx -dump 'http://p1k3.com/userland-book/' | head
userland
@ -95,12 +100,12 @@ which originated at the University of Kansas in the early 1990s, still works:
struck me as a good hook for talking about the tools I use every day
with an audience of mixed technical background.
If you invoke Lynx _without_ the `-dump` option, it'll start up in interactive
mode, and you can navigate between links with the arrow keys. `-dump` spits a
rendered version of the page to standard output, with links annotated as
`[1]`-style footnotes and printed at the bottom of the output. Another useful
option here is `-listonly`, which will output just the list of links contained
within a page:
If you invoke Lynx without any options, it'll start up in interactive mode, and
you can navigate between links with the arrow keys. `-dump` spits a rendered
version of a page to standard output, with links annotated as `[1]`-style
footnotes and printed at the bottom of the output. Another useful option here
is `-listonly`, which will print just the list of links contained within a
page:
$ lynx -dump -listonly 'http://p1k3.com/userland-book/' | head
@ -114,8 +119,8 @@ within a page:
9. http://p1k3.com/userland-book/#a-book-about-the-command-line-for-humans
10. http://p1k3.com/userland-book/#copying
Another option is w3m, which copes a little more gracefully with some of
the complexities of modern web layout.
An alternative to Lynx is w3m, which copes a little more gracefully with of the
complexities of modern web layout.
$ w3m -dump 'http://p1k3.com/userland-book/' | head
userland
@ -129,13 +134,25 @@ the complexities of modern web layout.
hook for talking about the tools I use every day with an audience of mixed
technical background.
Neither of these options are going to replace enormously capable applications
like Chrome or Firefox for most users, but they have their place in the toolbox,
and help to demonstrate how the web is built (in part) on principles we've already
seen at work.
writing the web
---------------
I'm pretty comfortable writing HTML by hand. I've been doing it for a long
time, and having a decent grasp of how it works and how to express myself in it
is a pretty fundamental requirement of my day job. That doesn't mean I like
Most of the web that you interact with is generated by software that pulls data
out of databases and stitches it together into something your browser will
recognize, but it's still entirely possible to write complete HTML documents in
your text editor of choice.
{more to come}
writing the web, easier
-----------------------
I also spend a lot of time writing prose in text files, and
I'm pretty comfortable writing HTML by hand. It's part of my day job, and I've
been doing it for quite a while now.
{to come}
{more to come}

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