Brennen Bearnes 4 years ago
parent
commit
41fe006779
3 changed files with 20 additions and 2 deletions
  1. 1
    0
      endmatter/index.md
  2. 11
    2
      index.html
  3. 8
    0
      shared_space/index.md

+ 1
- 0
endmatter/index.md View File

@@ -5,6 +5,7 @@ further reading
5 5
 ---------------
6 6
 
7 7
 - _The Unix Programming Environment_ - Brian W. Kernighan, Rob Pike
8
+- [The Evolution of the Unix Time-sharing System](http://cm.bell-labs.com/cm/cs/who/dmr/hist.html) - Dennis M. Ritchie
8 9
 - [AT&T Archives: The UNIX Operating System](https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tc4ROCJYbm0) (YouTube)
9 10
 - [I had a couple drinks and woke up with 1,000 nerds](https://medium.com/message/tilde-club-i-had-a-couple-drinks-and-woke-up-with-1-000-nerds-a8904f0a2ebf) - Paul Ford
10 11
 

+ 11
- 2
index.html View File

@@ -2680,6 +2680,14 @@ This is part of the story of how ideas like e-mail and chat were originally
2680 2680
 born, well before networks took over the world:  As ways for the many users of
2681 2681
 one computer to communicate on the same machine.</p>
2682 2682
 
2683
+<p>Says Dennis Ritchie:</p>
2684
+
2685
+<blockquote><p>What we wanted to preserve was not just a good environment in which to do
2686
+programming, but a system around which a fellowship could form. We knew from
2687
+experience that the essence of communal computing, as supplied by
2688
+remote-access, time-shared machines, is not just to type programs into a
2689
+terminal instead of a keypunch, but to encourage close communication.</p></blockquote>
2690
+
2683 2691
 <p>Times have changed, and while it&rsquo;s mundane to use software that&rsquo;s shared
2684 2692
 between many users, it&rsquo;s not nearly as common as it once was for a bunch of us
2685 2693
 to be logged into the same computer all at once.</p>
@@ -3041,10 +3049,10 @@ April  5 2015
3041 3049
 
3042 3050
 
3043 3051
 <pre><code>$ seq 1 5 | shuf
3044
-5
3045 3052
 2
3046
-1
3047 3053
 3
3054
+5
3055
+1
3048 3056
 4
3049 3057
 </code></pre>
3050 3058
 
@@ -3126,6 +3134,7 @@ April  5 2015
3126 3134
 
3127 3135
 <ul>
3128 3136
 <li><em>The Unix Programming Environment</em> - Brian W. Kernighan, Rob Pike</li>
3137
+<li><a href="http://cm.bell-labs.com/cm/cs/who/dmr/hist.html">The Evolution of the Unix Time-sharing System</a> - Dennis M. Ritchie</li>
3129 3138
 <li><a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tc4ROCJYbm0">AT&amp;T Archives: The UNIX Operating System</a> (YouTube)</li>
3130 3139
 <li><a href="https://medium.com/message/tilde-club-i-had-a-couple-drinks-and-woke-up-with-1-000-nerds-a8904f0a2ebf">I had a couple drinks and woke up with 1,000 nerds</a> - Paul Ford</li>
3131 3140
 </ul>

+ 8
- 0
shared_space/index.md View File

@@ -16,6 +16,14 @@ This is part of the story of how ideas like e-mail and chat were originally
16 16
 born, well before networks took over the world:  As ways for the many users of
17 17
 one computer to communicate on the same machine.
18 18
 
19
+Says Dennis Ritchie:
20
+
21
+> What we wanted to preserve was not just a good environment in which to do
22
+> programming, but a system around which a fellowship could form. We knew from
23
+> experience that the essence of communal computing, as supplied by
24
+> remote-access, time-shared machines, is not just to type programs into a
25
+> terminal instead of a keypunch, but to encourage close communication.
26
+
19 27
 Times have changed, and while it's mundane to use software that's shared
20 28
 between many users, it's not nearly as common as it once was for a bunch of us
21 29
 to be logged into the same computer all at once.