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lynx -dump -listonly

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Brennen Bearnes 8 years ago
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@ -2597,6 +2597,8 @@ called Night. <del>So the</del> <ins>And there was</ins> evening and <del>the
<hr />
<p>lynx: Invalid Option: -linksonly</p>
<h1><a name=the-internet-for-humans-and-how-the-command-line-can-help href=#the-internet-for-humans-and-how-the-command-line-can-help>#</a> 7. the internet for humans, and how the command line can help</h1>
<p>Web browsers are really complicated these days. They&rsquo;re full of rendering
@ -2695,6 +2697,26 @@ which originated at the University of Kansas in the early 1990s, still works:</p
with an audience of mixed technical background.
</code></pre>
<p>If you invoke Lynx <em>without</em> the <code>-dump</code> option, it&rsquo;ll start up in interactive
mode, and you can navigate between links with the arrow keys. <code>-dump</code> spits a
rendered version of the page to standard output, with links annotated as
<code>[1]</code>-style footnotes and printed at the bottom of the output. Another useful
option here is <code>-listonly</code>, which will output just the list of links contained
within a page:</p>
<pre><code>$ lynx -dump -listonly 'http://p1k3.com/userland-book/' | head
References
2. http://p1k3.com/2013/8/4
3. http://p1k3.com/userland-book.git
4. https://github.com/brennen/userland-book
5. http://p1k3.com/userland-book/
6. https://twitter.com/brennen
9. http://p1k3.com/userland-book/#a-book-about-the-command-line-for-humans
10. http://p1k3.com/userland-book/#copying
</code></pre>
<p>Another option is w3m, which copes a little more gracefully with some of
the complexities of modern web layout.</p>


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lynx: Invalid Option: -linksonly
7. the internet for humans, and how the command line can help
=============================================================
@ -94,6 +95,24 @@ which originated at the University of Kansas in the early 1990s, still works:
struck me as a good hook for talking about the tools I use every day
with an audience of mixed technical background.
If you invoke Lynx _without_ the `-dump` option, it'll start up in interactive
mode, and you can navigate between links with the arrow keys. `-dump` spits a
rendered version of the page to standard output, with links annotated as
`[1]`-style footnotes and printed at the bottom of the output. Another useful
option here is `-listonly`, which will output just the list of links contained
within a page:
$ lynx -dump -listonly 'http://p1k3.com/userland-book/' | head
References
2. http://p1k3.com/2013/8/4
3. http://p1k3.com/userland-book.git
4. https://github.com/brennen/userland-book
5. http://p1k3.com/userland-book/
6. https://twitter.com/brennen
9. http://p1k3.com/userland-book/#a-book-about-the-command-line-for-humans
10. http://p1k3.com/userland-book/#copying
Another option is w3m, which copes a little more gracefully with some of
the complexities of modern web layout.
@ -113,4 +132,10 @@ the complexities of modern web layout.
writing the web
---------------
I'm pretty comfortable writing HTML by hand. I've been doing it for a long
time, and having a decent grasp of how it works and how to express myself in it
is a pretty fundamental requirement of my day job. That doesn't mean I like
I also spend a lot of time writing prose in text files, and
{to come}

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