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# How To Migrate a Parse App to Parse Server on Ubuntu 14.04 (ROUGH DRAFT - INCOMPLETE)
### Introduction
Parse is a Mobile Backend as a Service platform, owned by Facebook since 2013. In January of 2016, Parse announced that its hosted services would shut down completely on January 28, 2017. In order to help its users transition away from the service, Parse has released an open source version of its backend, called **Parse Server**, which can be deployed to environments running Node.js and MongoDB.
Parse is a Mobile Backend as a Service platform, owned by Facebook since 2013. In January of 2016, Parse announced that its hosted services would shut down completely on January 28, 2017.
Fortunately, Parse has also released [an open source API server][parse-server], compatible with the hosted service's API, called **Parse Server**. Parse Server is under active development, and seems likely to attract a large developer community. It can be be deployed to a range of environments running Node.js and MongoDB.
This guide focuses on migrating a pre-existing Parse application to a standalone instance of Parse Server, with TLS/SSL encryption for all connections using a certificate provided by Let's Encrypt.
This guide focuses on migrating a pre-existing Parse application to a standalone instance of Parse Server running on Ubuntu 14.04. It uses TLS/SSL encryption for all connections, using a certificate provided by Let's Encrypt, a new Certificate Authority which offers free certificates. It includes a few details specific to DigitalOcean and Ubuntu 14.04, but should be broadly applicable to systems running recent Debian-derived GNU/Linux distributions.
<$>[warning]
**Warning:** It is strongly recommended that this procedure first be tested with a development or test version of the app before attempting it with a user-facing production app.
@ -79,7 +79,7 @@ Note the path and expiration date of your certificate, highlighted in the exampl
### Set Up Let's Encrypt Auto Renewal
<$>[warning]
**Warning:** You can safely complete this guide without worrying about certificate renewal, but you will need to address it for any long-lived production environment.
**Warning:** You can safely complete this guide without worrying about certificate renewal, but you **will** need to address it for any long-lived production environment.
<$>
You may have noticed that your Let's Encrypt certificate is due to expire in 90 days. This is a deliberate feature of the Let's Encrypt approach, intended to minimize the amount of time that a compromised certificate can exist in the wild if something goes wrong.
@ -393,7 +393,7 @@ Exit to your regular `sudo` user:
exit
```
Tell `pm2` to install initialization scripts, to be run as the **parse** user, using `/home/parse` as its home directory:
Tell `pm2` to install initialization scripts for Ubuntu, to be run as the **parse** user, using `/home/parse` as its home directory:
```command
sudo pm2 startup ubuntu -u parse --hp /home/parse/
@ -556,8 +556,8 @@ tk tk tk
[env-vars]: https://www.digitalocean.com/community/tutorials/how-to-read-and-set-environmental-and-shell-variables-on-a-linux-vps
[howto-hostname]: https://www.digitalocean.com/community/tutorials/how-to-set-up-a-host-name-with-digitalocean
[howto-letsencrypt]: https://www.digitalocean.com/community/tutorials/how-to-secure-nginx-with-let-s-encrypt-on-ubuntu-14-04
[howto-letsencrypt-auto]: https://www.digitalocean.com/community/tutorials/how-to-secure-nginx-with-let-s-encrypt-on-ubuntu-14-04#step-4-—-set-up-auto-renewal
[howto-letsencrypt]: https://www.digitalocean.com/community/tutorials/how-to-secure-nginx-with-let-s-encrypt-on-ubuntu-14-04
[howto-mongodb]: https://www.digitalocean.com/community/tutorials/how-to-install-mongodb-on-ubuntu-14-04
[howto-nameservers]: https://www.digitalocean.com/community/tutorials/how-to-point-to-digitalocean-nameservers-from-common-domain-registrars
[new-ubuntu-checklist]: https://www.digitalocean.com/community/tutorial_series/new-ubuntu-14-04-server-checklist
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[parse-server-guide]: https://parse.com/docs/server/guide
[parse-server-guide-migrating]: https://parse.com/docs/server/guide#migrating
[parse-server]: https://github.com/ParsePlatform/parse-server
[pm2]: http://pm2.keymetrics.io/
[run-parse-server]: https://www.digitalocean.com/community/tutorials/how-to-run-parse-server-on-ubuntu-14-04
[yaml]: http://yaml.org/
[pm2]: http://pm2.keymetrics.io/

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</head>
<body>
<h1>How To Migrate a Parse App to Parse Server on Ubuntu 14.04 (ROUGH DRAFT - INCOMPLETE)</h1>
<h3>Introduction</h3>
<p>Parse is a Mobile Backend as a Service platform, owned by Facebook since 2013. In January of 2016, Parse announced that its hosted services would shut down completely on January 28, 2017. In order to help its users transition away from the service, Parse has released an open source version of its backend, called <strong>Parse Server</strong>, which can be deployed to environments running Node.js and MongoDB.</p>
<p>Parse is a Mobile Backend as a Service platform, owned by Facebook since 2013. In January of 2016, Parse announced that its hosted services would shut down completely on January 28, 2017.</p>
<p>Fortunately, Parse has also released <a href="https://github.com/ParsePlatform/parse-server">an open source API server</a>, compatible with the hosted service&rsquo;s API, called <strong>Parse Server</strong>. Parse Server is under active development, and seems likely to attract a large developer community. It can be be deployed to a range of environments running Node.js and MongoDB.</p>
<p>This guide focuses on migrating a pre-existing Parse application to a standalone instance of Parse Server, with TLS/SSL encryption for all connections using a certificate provided by Let&rsquo;s Encrypt.</p>
<p>This guide focuses on migrating a pre-existing Parse application to a standalone instance of Parse Server running on Ubuntu 14.04. It uses TLS/SSL encryption for all connections, using a certificate provided by Let&rsquo;s Encrypt, a new Certificate Authority which offers free certificates. It includes a few details specific to DigitalOcean and Ubuntu 14.04, but should be broadly applicable to systems running recent Debian-derived GNU/Linux distributions.</p>
<p>&lt;$>[warning]
<strong>Warning:</strong> It is strongly recommended that this procedure first be tested with a development or test version of the app before attempting it with a user-facing production app.
@ -86,7 +86,7 @@
<h3>Set Up Let&rsquo;s Encrypt Auto Renewal</h3>
<p>&lt;$>[warning]
<strong>Warning:</strong> You can safely complete this guide without worrying about certificate renewal, but you will need to address it for any long-lived production environment.
<strong>Warning:</strong> You can safely complete this guide without worrying about certificate renewal, but you <strong>will</strong> need to address it for any long-lived production environment.
&lt;$></p>
<p>You may have noticed that your Let&rsquo;s Encrypt certificate is due to expire in 90 days. This is a deliberate feature of the Let&rsquo;s Encrypt approach, intended to minimize the amount of time that a compromised certificate can exist in the wild if something goes wrong.</p>
@ -364,14 +364,16 @@ pm2 start ecosystem.json
[PM2] Dumping processes
</code></pre>
<p>The list of processes <code>pm2</code> is running for the <strong>parse</strong> user should now be stored in <code>/home/parse/.pm2</code>. In order to restore the <code>parse-wrapper</code> we defined in <code>ecosystem.json</code> the next time the server restarts, we will just need to define a startup script to run <code>pm2</code> as <strong>parse</strong> and restore its processes. Fortunately, <code>pm2</code> can generate and install a script on its own.</p>
<p>The list of processes <code>pm2</code> is running for the <strong>parse</strong> user should now be stored in <code>/home/parse/.pm2</code>.</p>
<p>Now we need to make sure the <code>parse-wrapper</code> process we defined earlier in <code>ecosystem.json</code> is restored each time the server is restarted. Fortunately, <code>pm2</code> can generate and install a script on its own.</p>
<p>Exit to your regular <code>sudo</code> user:</p>
<pre><code class="custom_prefix(parse\s$)">exit
</code></pre>
<p>Tell <code>pm2</code> to install initialization scripts, to be run as the <strong>parse</strong> user, using <code>/home/parse</code> as a home directory:</p>
<p>Tell <code>pm2</code> to install initialization scripts for Ubuntu, to be run as the <strong>parse</strong> user, using <code>/home/parse</code> as its home directory:</p>
<pre><code class="command">sudo pm2 startup ubuntu -u parse --hp /home/parse/
</code></pre>


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